Silicone Heaters for 3D Printers

#1

Hello everybody! I’m not a so big expert in 3D printing like you all, even if I worked 3 years in HP Inc. In my new company, the main product is a silicone flexible hetaers, that some of my customers, were using to heat some parts of the 3D printer. In many cases, they were using the heater to keep in a cheap and easy manner their “ingredients” at the right temperature; others were using for heating just the base metallic plate…let’s say, according to the kind of printer, they were needing some heating operation to work more efficiently. Simple to design, quite flexible and so adaptable to any shape, cheap and up to 230ºC (or 4/5W/cm2) are our best qualities. Now, I was wondering, if you experts can suggest to me which brands, which kind of printers could need this kind of melting/heating mat. I found that many manufacturer due to their singular technology won’t never had these kind of problems, but others it’s almost mandatory. Thanks a lot for you kind collaboration. Bye. Mirko

0 Likes

#2

Hi Mirko,

If you like to sell something I’d suggest go straight our with your link to the website, spare yourself the small talk part and show specs instead. Do you have an EU warehouse ?

THX
Jan P.

0 Likes

#3

Hi Jan,

thanks but you were to clever. Anyone wants to sell, but here I wanted to understand, before. These heating mats have few parameters on which to play> shape, power density and temperature to deliver&control. There are thousand of applications. There are no *or very few( standards products. I wanted to understand if it-s applicable this sector, in a profitable way. This pass through numbers. A heating mat to equip the plate (30x30cm) for a small 3D printer could worth 60/70 EURO. And it will work for years at the desired temperature. I can go deeper in details, but before I have to know where and how to apply it.
I’m in Europe: Barcelona, Spain. And this is my company: http://www.ohmvo.com/

Have a nice day.
Thanks.
Bye
Mirko

0 Likes

#4

I have been looking myself for a quick fix heater pad for days. By quick fix I mean just something to get me going till I get a proper E3D 230V AC heated bed. Your business did not show up when I searched in Google but I did not look for industrial pads, only in context of 3D printers. I would guess size wise anything between 100x100mm to 300x300mm would be standard but from what I came across in my search, most offers are for 210mm (or near enough) print beds. Voltage wise 12V DC or 24V DC is probably most common (many do both, 12 and 24V DC) and temperatures up to 110-120 degree Celsius should cover most hobby 3D printer applications. The heater pads and also fully assembled PCB heated beds that i have seem for 3D printers have a termistor. I personally dislike the idea of adhesive heater pads, have made bad experiences else where with those (not in a 3D printer), I would personally prefer PCB heated beds or in case of E3D’s 230V AC print bed a factory processed bonding between bed and heater. If things go wrong then I have the entire assembly in warranty and not just the heater pad. I have my “quick fix” heater now ordered, otherwise I would have give your heaters a shot.

Have FuN!
Jan

PS: Having stuff available at reasonable cost and good quality in the EU is REALLY something positive, I am fed up with the common practice of Amazon and Ebay to list China based sellers in the default search settings and you have to read the small print to actually find out they ship from China.

PPS: I see you have heating mats with PT100 or Termocouples. From what I have seen so far most motion controller boards handle Termistors without the need of external hardware. I don’t think your temperature probes will work as a direct replacement for an existing print bed heater on commonly used motion controllers.

0 Likes

#5

Hi Snoozer, sorry for the delay. Too busy. Really, I didnt understood how is made your bed print. Not so common, as I told you, with 3D printing. What I can provide is a silicone, flexible mat (fstandard thickness 1mm, but I can go down to 0.5mm) that contains an etched foil resistive circuit, designed to deliver temperature up to 250ºC. Whatever voltage. Whatever power (with sense…) up to 4/5W/cm2. Then. Infinites applications. From de-icing to sealing or keeping at temperature liquids, bla bla. Many applications in industry, see the silicone mat sticked with acrylic adehsive up to 150ºC. We have a special patented glue that works up to 230ºC. Or in alternative, you can vulcanize the silicone onto whatever metallic plate. Finally. I thought that at the end I can make a print bed just like that: 2mm thick aluminium plate and on the reserve side you have the heating mat. Normally you control the temperature of the heater, since any heater has to be between 30/80ºC hotter than the heated object. Sometimes the operative temperature is so high that Tworking+30º/80ºC= BURNT PAD. Within your range of ºT, it’s ok, to control directly the bed. Anyway. I think that after all is not a matetr of technology (I start from raw silicone, so, any shape, any thickness, any kind of accessories or cable can be used) but of price. For example, a print bed, conceived like I did (alu plate with a heating mat stuck on the reverse side) , without PT100, at what fair (no chinese stuffs) price you’d sell it on the market? HArd question…I know…but I could consider to standardizez 3/4 dimensions, and make a production line with that…Any comments, as always, is welcome! Bye. Mirko

0 Likes

#6

Hi Mirko,

I do not know what sizes to focus on, I (me personally only) came across mostly Prusa I3 MK3 or MK2 size print beds and also Ultimaker 2 which ale listed a lot on ebay. If those are indeed the most commonly sold I can not answer. I will buy my final print bed from E3D, they have a 300x300 230V AC print bed with vulcanised silicone heater on the back. I think that also goes over 200 degree. No offense but E3D does 3D Printing stuff since a long time and I just trust them to do it right. Your product might be just as good, I cant tell cause there is no history to look at. Do you have a 3D printer ? If not maybe get one and use it or have your R&D department use it, I am sure they come up with a useful product with the right temperature range and the commonly working termistor. Flexible instead of solid wires is another thing. Print beds move, some up and down, others back and forward. The wiring needs to be flexible.

Regards
Jan

0 Likes

#7

Hi Jan,

sorry for the delay. Yes, you are right, we’d need to buy some 3D printer and test the solution on them. We surely can do something good, but the problem is the cost. We are involved on “more complex” heating mats, where we hardly find any competitors. For sure, the semplicity and the large scale you need for having a competitive price, don’t help us. Anyway, many thanks for your suggestions, and in case you need something to be heated… =)
Good luck.
Bye
Mirko

0 Likes